Ah, Paris!

The last leg of our journey took us to Paris for four days. We returned our rental car in St Malo and boarded the high-speed TGV train which can travel up to 200 miles per hour.

20141021-IMG_4035

Lorette used the time to catch up on her journal.

Sweetpea checks for spelling

Sweetpea checks for spelling

The trouble with posting travel photos on Facebook for clever friends to see is that you get reposts like this:

Thanks, Kilgore!

Thanks, Kilgore!

Our hotel in Paris was the Luxembourg Parc, you guessed it, right across the street from Luxembourg Park.

Entrance

Entrance

The library

The library

And most important of all, a well-stocked bar with a friendly bartender

And most important of all, a well-stocked bar with a friendly bartender

There were quite a few neighborhood restaurants within walking distance of the hotel. Cuisine de Philippe was right across the alley.

View from our room

View from our room

Most of the rain during our trip occurred while we were on the train. Looks like some other folks weren’t so lucky.

20141021-IMG_7513

One of my favorite things about Paris is just taking time to get lost while walking around. Here are some random street scenes…

The Seine looking toward the Ile de la Cite

The Seine looking toward Ile de la Cite

Bookseller stalls

Bookseller stalls along the Seine

20141021-IMG_751620141023-IMG_771020141022-IMG_7629

I think it is possible to buy anything in Paris. A couple of shop windows…

20141021-IMG_750520141021-IMG_751420141024-IMG_7747

The Orsay Museum used to be a railroad station.

20141022-IMG_7538

20141022-IMG_7548

 

Guards at the National Assembly

Guards at the National Assembly

Locks on the Pont des Arts

Locks on the Pont des Arts

Closeup

Closeup

OK, time to play tourist. Here we are at the Arc de Triomphe, built by Napoleon to commemorate the French victory at the Battle of Austerlitz in 1805.

IMG_0855

165 feet high, 130 feet wide

165 feet high, 130 feet wide

French Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Underneath the Arch, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

284 steps to the observation deck up top

284 steps to the observation deck up top

Looking down the Champs Elysees

Looking down the Champs Elysees

Looking toward Sacre Coeur which we will visit later

Looking toward Sacre Coeur which we will visit later

And who could resist taking a photo of the Eiffel Tower from the top of the Arc de Triomphe?

And who could resist taking a photo of the Eiffel Tower from the top of the Arc de Triomphe?

A closer view of the Eiffel Tower from underneath.

20141022-IMG_7626

On to the Louvre.

IMG_0882

Remember that Facebook friend with Photoshop and too much time on his hands?

10703752_803740813017049_3641541892261568596_n

The Louvre is probably the most famous museum in the world and, as such, it gets thousands of visitors every day. The day we were there was no exception.

Winged Victory

Winged Victory

The Mona Lisa

The Mona Lisa

Tired of the crowds, we asked this guy for some restaurant tips.

20141022-IMG_4049

Please, please, please take me with you!

So many bistros, so little time.

20141022-IMG_4042

Ah, Beef Bourguignon and a  a nice little Burgundy wine.

Ah, Beef Bourguignon and a a nice little Burgundy wine.

Literally right across the street from our hotel was the Luxembourg Museum. Turns out the current exhibition was titled: Paul Durand-Ruel, The Impressionist Gamble- Manet, Monet Renoir…. Durand-Rule was a Parisian art dealer who was one of the first to embrace the Impressionist Movement in the late 1800s. This exhibition was gathered from museums around the world and displayed works that had passed through Durand-Ruel’s gallery. The crowds were all at the Louvre and the Orsay. This spectacular collection we had virtually all to ourselves.

Luxembourg Museum

Luxembourg Museum

Renoir

Renoir

Monet

Monet

Degas

Degas

Right behind the museum is Luxembourg Park, a wonderful public space and a nice place to feel more like a local.

20141023-IMG_7689

Tai chi in the park

Tai chi in the park

The Medici Fountain was built in 1630 by Marie de' Medici, the widow of King Henry IV of France to remind her of her native Florence

The Medici Fountain was built in 1630 by Marie de’ Medici, the widow of King Henry IV of France to remind her of her native Florence

On the way out to explore one day we stumbled upon this little hole-in-the wall place which had eight tables fit into a space no larger than our kitchen. I ordered blood sausage and apparently chose the wrong wine to go with it. The waitress tactfully suggested a more suitable pairing. That’s how memories are made!

20141023-IMG_7708

We had a four-day Metro pass and got pretty good at finding our way around Paris.

10481424_10203975642384236_3864617828496908688_n

Construction of Notre-Dame Cathedral began in 1163 and was among the first buildings in the world to use flying buttress (arched exterior supports) none of which are shown in this photo.

20141023-IMG_7736

Charlemagne united most of Western Europe for the first time since the Roman Empire.

Statue of Charlemagne who united most of Western Europe for the first time since the Roman Empire.

Note what is sitting on her hat

Note what is sitting on her hat

20141023-IMG_7734

A visit to Sacré-Cœur Basilica located at the summit of the butte Montmartre, the highest point in the city.

20141024-IMG_7748

A Metro ticket also works for the funicular which saves walking up 300 steps.

20141024-IMG_7750

What’s a Basilica without a few gargoyles to ward off the evil spirits?

20141024-IMG_7754

And to end this rather lengthy post, a question. Why would someone leave their bra and slip beside a tree?

20141024-IMG_7760

 

Comments are closed.