Cape Cod

Lorette had a medical conference scheduled in Boston for the last part of April so we decided to travel several days early and explore Cape Cod, a place neither of us had been to before. For the most part, the weather was sunny and brisk. The restaurants and other businesses that had been closed for the winter were just beginning to open for the season but the hoards of tourists that descend on the Cape in the summer had yet to arrive so we had the place virtually to ourselves.

After landing at BOS in the evening and staying in the city the first night, we headed out after an amazing Sunday Brunch at the Seaport Boston Hotel. First stop was Plymouth and the National Monument to the Forefathers, an 81 foot monument completed in 1888.

National Monument to the Forefathers

National Monument to the Forefathers

The monument honors the ideals of the Mayflower Pilgrims. It is thought to be the world’s largest solid granite monument and is the third-tallest statue in the United States. It was the site of the first sock picture of the trip.

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One can’t be in Plymouth without seeking out The Rock. So, here’s a rock with 1620, the year the Mayflower landed, inscribed on it. However, the first written reference to this particular rock was in 1715 so the rock is more of a symbol than a real part of history.

Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rock

Debunking myths tends to work up an appetite so we found a harbor side seafood shack recommended by several locals.

Wood's Seafood

Wood’s Seafood

In search of the perfect lobster roll.

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The Captain’s House Inn in Chatham was our home for four days.

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Wild Pigeon

Wild Pigeon

Complete with a cozy fireplace

Complete with a cozy fireplace

A different breakfast each day

A different breakfast each day

For me, a highlight of the trip was a visit to the Cape Cod National Seashore.

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Nauset Light

Nauset Light

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Guglielmo Marconi erected a large antenna array here and completed the first transatlantic wireless communication between the United States and Europe in 1903.

Built in 1902; abandoned in 1920

Built in 1902; abandoned in 1920

Back in town, there is a terrific little museum called the Chatham Marconi Maritime Center. In 1914, Marconi built a high powered wireless station in Massachusetts. The receivers were in Chatham and the transmitters were forty miles west, in Marion. The station was paired with a station in Norway to provide wireless communication between the two continents, using Morse code. During World War II the station was taken over by the Navy and played a roll in tracking German U-Boats in the Atlantic. A visit here really made the movie, The Imitation Game, come to life.

A code breaker

A code breaker

OK, the next photo is cheating. It’s a photo of a photo. But I need to include it since it beautifully conveys the scenery around the cape with the many bogs.

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As you can tell by the next photo, it could be windy and cool, even with the sun shining.

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Which is a good reason to find a cozy spot for some clam chowder and another lobster roll.

Warming up by the fire

Warming up by the fire

Clam Chowder

Clam Chowder

This one was more like lobster salad on a roll

This one was more like lobster salad on a roll

Chatham turned out to be a great home base for exploring. The next photos were taken right in town.

Chatham Lighthouse,  established in 1808

Chatham Lighthouse, established in 1808

Part of the National Seashore near Chatham

Part of the National Seashore near Chatham

Seals snoozing on the beach

Seals snoozing on the beach

And to end this post, a few pictures of perhaps one of the best meals we had on the trip: Twenty Eight Atlantic at the Wequassett Resort.

View as the sun was going down

View as the sun was going down

A cucumber Martini to start

A cucumber Martini to start

Appetizer

Appetizer

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Goodbye, Cape Cod, it was fun getting to know you!

Lorette back at the Captain's House

Lorette back at the Captain’s House

Comments

Cape Cod — 1 Comment

  1. I don’t know which I like more–your landscapes, historic sites or sumptuous meals. You sure know how to capture a moment!