Three Retired Amigos

Jeff, Max and I are retired. Several months ago we decided to start a ‘Boys Day Out’ to explore the local landscape. So far this has included visits to the Museum of Glass, the western art collection at the Tacoma Art Museum, America’s Car Museum, a retirement planning seminar, and the opening of a new Whole Foods Market. Here’s a report on last week’s adventure.

Karpels Manuscript Library Museum

Jeff and Max at the Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum

David Karpeles made his money in California real estate and started collecting documents in the ’70s. By 1983 he had one of the largest private document collections in the world and decided to distribute them to museums he established in eleven cities across the United States. This is truly an eclectic assortment. For example:

* The original etchings from Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist

* The official report of the Titanic rescue by the captain of the RMS Carpathia

* A paper tape of the first message sent by Morse Code

* The navigator’s log of the Enola Gay when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima

* The written confession of Japan’s War Minister, Tojo, who ordered the Bataan Death March

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Just across the street from the Karpeles Manuscript Library is the W W Seymour Conservatory, a Tacoma icon since 1908, and one of only three Victorian-style conservatories on the West Coast.

Max and John at the Seymour Conservatory

Max and John at the Seymour Conservatory

Jeff and Max admiring the tropical foliage

Jeff and Max admiring the tropical foliage

Hungry fish

Hungry fish

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Not native to the Pacific Northwest

These adventures always involve food. As you can imagine, looking at documents and admiring tropical vegetation works up quite an appetite. Next stop, the Parkway Tavern.

My favorite neighborhood watering hole

My favorite neighborhood watering hole

Where beer pull handles go when they die

Where beer pull handles go when they die

A mushroom swiss burger. Not pictured: a pint of local IPA.

A mushroom swiss burger. Not pictured: a pint of local IPA.

Still time for one more stop so we head for the Foss Waterway Seaport. The Seaport is in a century-old wheat transfer facility, one of two remaining wooden warehouses originally built as a mile-long complex in 1900 to accommodate square-rigged ships that frequented the port during the early years of Tacoma’s history.

The Tacoma was part of Puget Sounds Mosquito Fleet

The Tacoma was part of Puget Sounds Mosquito Fleet

Jeff and Max

Jeff and Max

One of the many displays showing the nautical heritage of the area

One of the many displays showing the nautical heritage of the area

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Comments

Three Retired Amigos — 2 Comments

  1. Absolutely love this blog/post. Love history, and it must be exciting to track down where and how something happened, or was built, and the situations that resulted in the final story. Good for you!